We shouldn't let deflation go out of control

We shouldn't let deflation go out of control

 

Lesson from Japan

Don't let deflation go out ofcontrol

By ZHENG YANGPENG

 (China Daily  )Updated: 2015-04-21 10:57

S&P economist warns that excessive concern over 'moral hazardcould trigger financial crisis

Policymakers always face a dilemma between prioritizing growth or deleveragingand centralbanks inspire skepticism when they pump money into the financial system to prop up growthBut Paul Sheardchief global economist of Standard & Poor's Ratings Services LLCsaid thatJapan's experience over the past two decades offers lessons for the people making decisions inChina today.

Sheardan expert on Japan's economy who held academicmarkets and advisory roles in thatcountry for 17 yearsargued that aggressive monetary policythe first arrow of what has come tobe known as Abenomicsis crucial to break the "downward spiral". The past two decades in Japan have been marked by persistent deflation that deters corporateinvestment and causes a rise in the real level of debtwhich further intensifies deflationIn thatrespectthe consumption tax increase last April was "unwise", according to Sheardwhen itcomes to ending entrenched deflation.

The Japanese government was aware of the risk of raising the consumption taxWhat promptedit to do so was concern over the buildup of government debtwhich has exceeded 200 percent ofGDP"Nominal GDP in Japan is 6.5 percent below its peak levelwhich occurred in the fourth quarterof 1997. In the same periodthe United Statesnominal GDP increased 101 percentIf yournominal GDP is growingeven with zero real growththat helps to keep the debt ratio undercontrol.

"I'd argue that in the long termthe fiscal deterioration is due to Japan allowing deflation to takerootSo the first step toward putting the public finances on a sustainable path has to be policiesto end the deflation as soon as possible," he said.

Japan's dilemma offers lessons for ChinaMany critics have said that the current debt hangoverin this country is unsustainable and the only way out is to start the painful deleveraging processwhile sacrificing growthOther observers argue that you can never deleverage in a low-or no-growth economy.

While Sheard said that nominal GDP growth is importanthe added the government should becareful about "the quality of leverage". 

If there are sectors of the economy that have what are inessence nonperforming assets on one side of the ledger and debt on the other that can never berepaid by the assetsthe government has to make hard choices.

"The lesson from other countries isit is better to confront the issue and deal with it than cover itup and play for time in the hopes that the economy can grow out of the problem," he saidTo deal with the gap between assets and liabilitiesa common prescription from economists isto let the losses flow through to the creditorsHoweverthat is "risky", Sheard saidas it couldtrigger a financial crisis

The other optionwhich he recommendedis for the government to stepin and provide the necessary capital to entitiesor to monetize contingent debt by taking it ontoits own balance sheet.

Despite its obvious drawbacksmany economists support the first option in light of concern over"moral hazard", which refers to a situation in which one party takes more risk because someoneelse is likely to bear the burden of that riskSheard takes the middle ground

He said that if a government worries too much about moralhazard and allows a financial crisis to developit ends up bailing out the system anyway

Thatdoes not imply an unconditional bailout. "The best approach is to act in such a way as to further the reform agendawhich will send aclear signal to the markets that it is a 'one-offdeal," he said.

"That's what the US did in 2008-09 ... it did the Troubled Assets Relief Programwhich injectedup to $700 billion into banks and other financial institutions to recapitalize them), it didquantitative easingbut it also did the Dodd-Frank Actand it put restrictions on what the FederalReserve Board could do and changed the whole bailout framework." He said the worst thing is what Japan did in 1990s, which was to use forbearancetry to cover upthe problems and wish that in timethings will come good.

 

网友评论:

已有0条评论
* 评论内容:
* 验证码: 看不清楚,换一个

正文右侧广告一

正文右侧广告二

Ibeacon管理系统诚招代理

正文右侧广告三