Chinese words increase in English dictionary

Chinese words increase in English dictionary

 

ReportChinese words surge in English dictionary

By He Keyao ( chinadaily.com.cn )

Updated: 2015-04-30 15:03:59

 

 

Report: Chinese words surge in English dictionary

 

A screen shot of the Urban Dictionary's explanation of Chinese borrowed word "no zuo no die".[Photo/chinadaily.com.cn]

 

 

 

An official report released on Wednesday shows that the number of Chinese words in Englishdictionary has rocketed in the past 20 years and the internationalization of Chinese language hasbecome a new cultural trend.

According to the Cultural Construction Blue PaperChina's Culture Development Report(2014), published by Hubei University and Social Sciences Academic Press (China), the use ofChinese words in foreign languages is growing at a fast rate.

Chinese Internet buzzwordssuch as "no zuo no die" (which translates into English as "if you don'tdo stupid thingsthey won't come back and bite you in the back"), "you can you upno can noBB" (which rougly translates into English as "if you can do it you should go up and do itinsteadof criticizing otherswork") have already been incorporated into the American Urban Dictionary,creating a big splash on the Internet last year.

Other words like "Tuhao" (meaning rich rednecksand "Dama" (referring to elderly womenarelikely to be included in the Oxford Dictionary in the coming daysdrawing global attention.

The report said that the increasing use of Chinese is a sign of the country's national power andInternational status.

Base on initial statisticsthere are more than 3,000 colleges and universities in over 100countries that teach Chinese language

In Koreaaround 100 institutions offer Chinese courses and over 1,000,000 students are learningitwhile in Japanthe number of people learning Chinese has reached 2,000,000. In the USaloneup to 3,000 high schools are offering Chinese courses.

Marie Tulloch, 24, a postgraduate student of Foreign Trade University from the UKsaid it it'spossible that Mandarin words would be used in English in everyday life in the future.

"English already has some Cantonese wordsLike the pan we use for cookingwe call it 'wok',which comes from Cantonese," she said, "maybe it is just a matter of time before we useMandarin."

Judith Huang, 29, from Singaporesaid that borrowing words from other languages is a way tokeep culture alive.

"Language is alive so there will naturally be borrowing from one language to another especiallyas more people become bilingual," She said.

Meanwhilethe document also said that the "Chinese feveris not as hot as previously reported.The total number of those learning Chinese as a second language is still below 150 millionworldwidelagging behind popular choices such as FrenchSpanish and Japanese.

The blue paper added that those borrowed Chinese wordswith their corresponding social andcultural backgroundwould help the western world get a deeper understanding of China.Howeverit is still too early to see their impact on the mainstream English language.

 

 

网友评论:

已有0条评论
* 评论内容:
* 验证码: 看不清楚,换一个

正文右侧广告一

正文右侧广告二

Ibeacon管理系统诚招代理

正文右侧广告三